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  • Richard Bonetti

The Great Tree Migration

Updated: 5 days ago

Emergence Magazine website has a beautiful, informative, poetic and touching tableau of stories using video, images, music and text about sugar maples, paper birch and red spruce: They Carry Us With Them:


"The Earth now has an atmospheric CO2 concentration of 419 parts per million, the highest the planet has seen in three to five million years. In 2019, NASA stated that eighteen of the nineteen warmest years on record had occurred since 2001."


"Around the world, scores of species of trees are moving north, or west, or upslope. Some species are losing ground, others are gaining it. In the eastern United States, eighty-six species of trees are currently on the move. Pines, spruce, and firs are generally heading north; oaks and maples are heading west. Here in Maine, seven of the ten most common species of tree are predicted to have moderate to severe reductions in suitable habitat within a century."


"What do these changes to our forests mean? What are the trees taking with them and what is arriving in their wake? What is the relationship between the trees’ migration and the ecological systems and human communities that they are leaving behind? What does the movement of these beings reflect back to us in the present and foreshadow for the future?"


The primary cause of declining biodiversity, at least in recent times, is the appropriation, colonization, and intensifying use of lands already inhabited, used, and reshaped by current and prior societies." ~ Darren Ranco*

Emergence Magazine hosts "a variety of online and in-person programs and events aimed at providing a space where our wider community can connect through the power of story and explore the connections between culture, ecology, and spirituality. Thaey have an online book club, workshops, retreats, immersive leadership courses, gallery installations, conversations with contributors, and live pop-up events.


*Ranco is associate professor of anthropology and coordinator of Native American Research at the University of Maine, one of the SSI participating faculty, and a member of the Penobscot tribe—contributed to a paper entitled People Have Shaped Most of Terrestrial Nature for At Least 12,000 Years,

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